Tag Archives: Exhibition

View Finder

Mary Kate Maher at Little Metal Print

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November 3 – December 3, 2017

11-8:00pm Tuesday-Saturday
12-5:00pm Sunday

Little Metal Print is please announce View Finder, a solo show of new works by MaryKate Maher for our inaugural exhibition. Organized by guest curator Amanda McDonald Crowley, Maher will debut new sculpture and relief forms created with dye sublimation prints.

Maher draws inspiration from nature and the post-industrial environment. Exploiting materials that reference landscape, Maher focuses on how we visually perceive space as both flat and dimensional.

Maher plays with expectations of form, and disrupts perceptions of volume and weight. She manipulates her materials to obscure their origins: resins are cast, sanded and weathered to look like stone; a patinated copper surface reveals itself to be concrete and foam; dye sublimation prints are cut and inlaid into sculptural forms, altering the negative space.

For View Finder, Maher is presenting new relief works based on light refractions in water and frozen air pockets in ice. “I am interested to experiment with light to produce unique sculpture reliefs that have slight bends and curves to their form,” says Maher.

McDonald Crowley says “for this first exhibition at Little Metal Print, it is really exciting to be working with Maher who is pushing the custom printing techniques offered at the studio, and manipulating materials to make forms that are at once beautifully poetic and simultaneously disconcerting in their abstraction. The works allude to the vastness of open landscapes, but it is unclear whether it might be tundra, or desert; sky, sea, or ice. Maher finds beauty in both natural and industrial landscapes which is expressed through her color palette, and collaging techniques.”

Opening Reception
November 3, 2017 6-8:00pm
Artist Talk
November 19, 2017 2:00pm

Little Metal Print is the brainchild of fine-art printer Ken Allen of Ken Allen Studios. He says “I am very excited to be the first to bring a brick-and-mortar store to Williamsburg, where people can see and be part of the process of creating little metal prints for themselves.”

Media Contact: Dylan Staniszewski
917 – 588 – 5294
dylan@littlemetalprint.com

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View Finder

ViewFinder_MarkKateMaher

View Finder

an exhibition of new works by MaryKate Maher

at
Little Metal Print

Opening Reception
November 3, 6:00 – 8:00pm

Artist Talk
November 19, 2:00 – 3:00pm

Little Metal Print is please announce View Finder, a solo show of new works by MaryKate Maher for our inaugural exhibition. Organized by guest curator Amanda McDonald Crowley, Maher will debut new sculpture and relief forms created with dye sublimation prints. Maher draws inspiration from nature and the post-industrial environment. Exploiting materials that reference landscape, Maher focuses on how we visually perceive space as both flat and dimensional.

51 South 1st St., Brooklyn, NY 11249
(917) 588 – 5294
info@llittlemetalprint.com

November 3 – December 3, 2017

Little Metal Print is an artist run studio and experimental exhibition space that provides a personalized approach to fine art printing that is easily accessible to the public.

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Invisible In Plain Sight

Invisible in plain sight

 

Commissioned by Art Connects New York, Invisible in Plain Sight is an Augmented Reality exhibition developed specifically for Senior Planet in NYC with work by artists who are also members of Senior Planet: Menny Borovski; Amy Epstein; Erica Feld; Arthur Fornari; John Leicmon; Anna Link; Marilyn Pappas; Geraldine Scalia; Henry Soto. The exhibition was conceived in collaboration with Jeff Crouse and Sebastian Bach; works have been developed in collaboration with Jeff Crouse and Peter Lester; and Crouse had additionally developed the ArtConnectsAR app, built in the Unity game engine using the Vuforia AR platform, by which the exhibition is accessible.

The exhibition opens up a space to suspend disbelief and reimagine space in the built environment in New York City. Exploring the urban landscapes of the city including all of its nooks and crannies, Invisible In Plain Sight includes new ephemeral digital works specifically for the Augumented Reality app. Drawing on their experience as painters, photographers, sculptors, holographers, illustrators, and poets, the artists reimagine our cityscape.

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Invisible in Plain Sight
A Permanent Exhibition for Senior Planet Exploration Center
Curated by Amanda McDonald Crowley

Opening Reception with the Artists:
Thursday, November 17
6 – 8pm
Senior Planet Exploration Center
127 West 25th Street, New York, NY, 10001

 

Here are a few of the targets for viewing the exhibition! In situ at Senior Planet. To view the works, got to the Apple app store on your iPhone or iPad, download the app (developed by Jeff Crouse, of See-through Lab LLC). Open the app and point the camera at these targets to see the artworks

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The Skypod Project

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The Fifth House and PointB are pleased to announce the exhibition The Skypod Project, an exhibition of sculpture, photographic, and audio-visual works by artist Mark Parrish.

Open Reception:
Friday, September 16th, 7 – 11 PM

Fifth House 198 N. 4th St, Brooklyn, NY
near the Bedford L Train Station

The Centerpiece of the exhibition, the Skypod itself is a collapsible light-weight tent structure capable of hanging from trees, cliff faces, telephone poles or building facades allowing for suspension over diverse terrains.

This portable experience structure creates a mobile habitat for site-specific projects to evolve. At The Fifth House we will exhibit a working prototype of the Skypod that explores the context for the piece and situates the research Mark is concurrently doing at Dreamland – a creative community, the Fifth House’s sibling organization, in the deep woods of upstate New York. Night skies, frog songs, Vista Tunnels (constructed poetics views into the wetlands and woodlands at Dreamland) will frame the work.

Inspired by recent trips to various locations around the world where he has been researching urban and natural settings for artistic and creative retreats, Parrish has returned to a project that has long been in gestation: designing portable habitats where individuals or like-minded groups can immerse themselves in a range of contexts from natural settings, to interstitial zones, and temporary spaces – to create, contemplate, and build cohesive communities.

“Parrish builds social sculptures, in a very literal sense”, says curator for the exhibition, Amanda McDonald Crowley. “Moreover he equally activates personal experience and group dynamics. It is exciting to see him alternate this thinking between urban contexts and out into nature – where so many of his personal creative interventions have operated in intimate settings – while continuing to develop conceptual frameworks that are equal part about social interaction, and solitary contemplation.”

The Skypod Project, Parrish’s first solo gallery exhibition in 20 years, combines his experiences building social sculptures as live-work spaces, with his ongoing project to make in-situ works in natural contexts, and his passion for creating ‘portable experience structures’ – artworks that operate as an enabling apparatus for his audiences, and often also collaborators and co-conspirators, to engage with their surroundings.

Artist: Mark Parrish
Creative Collaborator: Sebastian Bach
Curator: Amanda McDonald Crowley
Project Manager: Lauren Comito

All-Night Party at Marcy North (upstairs) to follow the opening!

Exhibition dates: September 16 through October 30. Gallery Hours are Saturdays from 11:00 am-1:00 pm or by appointment.

About Mark Parrish
Mark Parrish is an American visionary, designer, and artist from Texas who has lived in New York since the 80’s. Primarily self-taught, Parrish started his own studio in Austin in the mid 70’s. His practice often involves analysis of movement and portability, cultural norms and systems of living. His work takes form in sculptural systems and synergetic architectural space, designed both as tools and as experiential spaces. For the last 20 years, Parrish founded and established an international artist community called PointB, which created short-term co-habitational spaces for mid-career creative professionals. Parrish also spearheads, the non-profit organization, PointB International, which continues to establish new locations worldwide.

About PointB
The PointB vision is a world enriched by the collaboration between global and local creative professionals questioning and transcending their familiar viewpoints while immersed in the social, scientific, and culturally enlightening challenges and inspiration of the moment.

Gallery Hours are Saturdays from 11:00 am-1:00 pm or by appointment.

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Food For Thought – Review of food nostalgia at Radiator Gallery

Qboro_articleThoughtful article – Food for Thought – posted by Kelly Marie Mancuso in the Queens Chronicle on Thursday, February 4, 2016 about the food nostalgia exhibition I have organized at Radiator Gallery. Read the full article here.

 

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food nostalgia

food nostalgia

 

Kira Nam Greene "Ring Ding vs. Ding Dong", 2015

Kira Nam Greene “Ring Ding vs. Ding Dong”, 2015

Radiator Gallery, Long Island City, New York
February 5 – March 11, 2016

Opening Reception: Friday February 5, 2016 at 6 – 9pm
Radiator Gallery, Long Island City, New York
10-61 Jackson Ave, LIC, NY 11106
tel: 347.677.3418 email: info@radiatorarts.com

exhibition dates: February 5 – March 13, 2016
gallery hours: Friday and Sunday 1-6pm or by appointment

Artists:
Cey Adams
Emilie Baltz
Disorientalism (Katherine Behar and Marianne M. Kim)
Gonzalo Fuenmajor
Kira Nam Greene
Jonathan Stein

 

Food nostalgia looks at food in contemporary America through a lens of fast food iconography and industrial food production. Participating artists variously draw on popular cultural references, brand recognition, bodies, memory, nostalgia, and playfulness. They ask us to think about our relationship to our colonial pasts, feminist thinking, cultural diversity, and marketing culture. The corporatisation of our food systems is deeply entrenched in our psyche; historical and contemporary trade routes of our food affect our cultural landscape. As a framework to explore how we cook, eat, and consume, food nostalgia will be a platform to share ideas, and food.

curator: Amanda McDonald Crowley

Press releasePRESS-Food-Nostalgia

Artists Bios: foodnostalgia_artistsbios

List of works:

Press:

NY Observer: food nostagia included in 10 Things to Do in New York’s Art World, by Paul Laster, Feb. 4, 2016

Food for Thought – review of food nostalgia at Radiator Gallery by Kelly Marie Mancuso in the Queens Chronicle on Thursday, February 4, 2016

Food Nostalgia included in Armory Arts Week Events.

 

Public Programs:

Opening Reception: Friday February 5, 2016

Hungry Hungarians Book Launch: Friday February 19, 2016

Junk Food Brunch: Sunday February 28, 2016

Nutritional Facts: Friday March 4, 2016

 

Installation shots:
Photographs by Jeanette May

 

 

 

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PointB Virtual

PointB Virtual

 

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The PointB Virtual Exhibitions Space is being developed as an accessible space to easily conceptualize and virtually install thematic exhibitions, with the goal of becoming a platform for peer to peer artists’ inspiration and discourse.

In one sense PointB Virtual commemorates and immortalizes the PointB Worklodge Brooklyn location, that will soon be demolished. But more importantly, it is a tool to showcase ideas, directions and philosophies through exhibitions, lectures, screenings and conversations. These events are not being held in an unfamiliar simulated space, but in a place which holds memory of those who have previously inhabited and used the building in this way.

In keeping with PointB philosophy, it is a place to propose and question conceptual frameworks for ongoing discourse though themed exhibitions. It is a space to continue to build and strengthen our community of nomadic creative professionals.

For our inaugural exhibitions, we have included works by artists from across the world who have lived and worked at PointB Worklodge Brooklyn.

The first three thematic exhibitions have been developed around the following themes:

Exhibition 1 Network
Exhibition 2 Transcendence
Exhibition 3 Discovery

Exhibitions Feature the work of: Carlos Aquilino, Jana Astanov, Sandra Becker, Sue Beyer, Louise Blyton, Gene Buser. James Carman, Luzia Castaneda, Claudia Christoffel, Lauren Comito, Maud Cotter, Hugo Curti, Jacob Dahlstrup, Uday Dhar, Maria Dorner, Hilda Ekeroth, Michael Fritsch, Jan Gilbert, HC Gilje, Erika Gofton, Eugenia Gortchakova, Elizabeth Gower, Anita Groener, Libby Heaney, Gavin Hogg, Hamu Isen, Svetlana Jovanovic, Ienke Kastelein, Michiel Knaven, Stefan Kürten, Susana Lopez Fernandez, Jennifer Macklem, Peter Martensen, Patrick Meagher, John R Neeson, Serge Onnen, Ardan Ozmenoglu, Cat Poljski, Manuel Quintana-Martelo, Arp Raph, Antje Rieck, Joerg Schwalfenberg, Julia Schwalfenberg, Andy Slater, Patricio Tasisto, Ralf Tekaat, Antoine Toniolo, Cornelius Völker, Andy Wauman, Cleo Wilkinson, Heidi Yardley, Claire Zakiewicz

Exhibitions Organised by: Sebasian Bach, Lauren Comito, Amanda McDonald Crowley and Mark Parrish

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Janette Beckman: Rebel Culture

Janette Beckman: Rebel Culture

 

Janette Beckman, Salt n Pepa, NYC, 1987

Janette Beckman, Salt n Pepa, NYC, 1987

Rebel Culture: Legends of Hip Hop and the Go Hard Boyz (Harlem Bikers)
September 02 – December 20, 2014
Location: Carver Bank | Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, NE
Artist Talk: Friday, September 19 | 7:00pm

Bemis Center 2014 artist-in-residence Janette Beckman has always had a fascination with alternative music scenes and street culture. With an eye for rebel culture, she often works on city streets, particularly those of New York, her adopted home.

The photographs in this exhibition include some of the most iconic images ever created of the early days of hip hop—including early images of Run DMC, Big Daddy Kane, Salt-N-Pepa, and a young LL Cool J.

Beckman came to New York in 1982, at a time when hip hop was in its infancy. Beckman recalls that she “fell right into the emerging hip hop scene, trains covered in graffiti, kids with boom boxes rhyming on the subway, street vendors selling hoop earrings and mix tapes.” Beckman’s photographs are characterized by her ability to capture the raw essence of her subjects.

Most recently, Beckman’s passion for street culture has led her to focus on the Harlem Go Hard Boyz dirt-bike club riders as subjects for a new body of work. Through her photographs, blending documentary honesty and formal rigor, Beckman captures the spirit and attitude that has brought the Go Hard Boyz a measure of national recognition.

Beckman’s approach to her photographic practice is really a collaboration between Beckman and her subjects. She doesn’t dictate or arrange her shots, but works with her subjects to capture moments of honesty, where the subject, not the photographer comes to the fore.

Janette Beckman, Rebel Culture, gallery brochure.

During her residency at the Bemis, Beckman also collaborated with local poet and Spoken Word performer Felicia Webster on “Photojournalism and Spoken Word Stories,” a series of workshops for area teens. Using digital cameras, the teens compiled images of their daily lives in North Omaha into a photo documentary, which integrated written and spoken word poems to express the reflections of their journeys.

Residency projects:

During her residency, Beckman spent time hitting the streets of Omaha in search of subjects: her practice has always been to get to know local people and explore contexts in which they live and work. She arrived in town just in time for the labor day parade, and did a wonderful portrait of local BBQ king, George Perkins and his wife Ossy, as well as a beautiful series of her concurrent residency cohort at the Bemis Center.

Finding that Omaha is not a city with a lot of pedestrian traffic, Beckman strategized and found ways to meet new people at events and gatherings. Her shoot of the Heavy Rotation Biker BBQ and an Omaha Intertribal Powwow beautifully capture her take on these Omaha gatherings.

 

About Janette Beckman
Londoner Janette Beckman began her career at the dawn of punk rock working for The Face and Melody Maker. She shot bands from The Clash to Boy George as well as three Police album covers. She later moved to New York at the dawn of the hip hop era, becoming one of the leading documentarians of the movement. Her photographs have been exhibited at HVW8 (Los Angeles), Analogue (Toronto), Belleville (Paris), Project Space (Los Angeles), Blender Gallery (Sydney), and Proud Gallery (London), among others. Her work has been collected in three volumes, including:Made in the UK: The Music of Attitude, 1977-1982 (PowerHouseBooks 2005); The Breaks, Stylin and Profilin 1982-1990 (PowerHouse Books 2007); and El Hoyo Maravilla (Dashwood Books 2011).

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Chloë Bass & Teal Gardner | Urban Design Lab

Urban Design Lab

UDL_roomshotUrban Design Lab
Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, NE
July 15 – November 1, 2014

In Summer 2014, I invited Chloë Bass and Teal Gardner to participate in the Bemis Center artist-in-residence program where they collaborated with 18 local researchers to shed new light on the nature of our urban landscape. Recruited from local high schools, the researchers first completed research for the Department of Local Affairs. Each teen filled out one of the templates listed below, sharing information about his or her experience of Omaha: making a map, designing a pamphlet, writing a review or offering advice. The shared information ranged from an account of where one student’s relatives lived in the context of her neighborhood to advice about how (and how not to) use particular parks for social activity.

Once trained in the Department of Local Affairs’ interactions and processes, researchers went into the community and asked local residents and workers to share information with the Department. One research day focused on the Old Market area, where teens engaged people at the Omaha Public Library, a coffee shop, an antique store and on the street. The second research day was focused in North Omaha, where teens collected information from people at Carver Bank, Love’s Jazz and Art Center and the Union for Contemporary Art.

Bass then organized the collected materials into a subjective guidebook. The Department of Local Affairs office installation is on view as part of the Urban Design Lab exhibition at the Bemis Center.

The Lab participants, who were recruited from local high schools, toured various parts of the city as field researchers and then synthesized their data in the Bemis’s gallery space, which consists of two parts: Chloë Bass’s The Department of Local Affairs and Teal Gardner’s Reading the City.

At the end of each week of data collection through Department of Local Affairs and Reading the City, the researchers worked as teams to develop as an intentional form of play. They were charged with the task of repurposing the sights and sounds they recorded into new tools and bodies of work, which will be offered to other visitors and participants in this space throughout the exhibition.

Taken as a whole, the Urban Design Lab provides deep, media-rich data about the city in which we live, as well as a new synthesis about the meaning of that data. As a place where new ideas and work are created, the Lab also echoes the ongoing creative processes that are at the heart of the Bemis Center’s internationally-recognized artist residency program.

The outcomes of research were shared at a Presentation Day on August 5, 2014

Curriculum
Department of Local Affairs
Reading the City workshops
Maker Days

Chloë Bass also realized her Department of Local Affairs over the summer of 2014 with the Laundromat Project, and also wrote a series of posts, Learning Omaha, on Hyperallergic during her residency.

About the Artists
Chloë Bass
In creating conceptual art (performances, situations, installations, publications), Chloë Bass’s goal is to investigate the potential of the everyday as a catalyst for intimacy. She is captivated by the common denominators of the human experience, such as the things that people always do, and she seeks to highlight the seemingly normal as a means of questioning its stability. Bass’s primary medium is people, and she uses performance as a metric to evaluate the successful function of interaction and engagement – person to person, and between people and their surroundings – rather than a spectacle for passive enjoyment. The artist has been a resident at POGON (Zagreb, Croatia), D21 Kunstraum/5533 art space (Leipzig, Germany and Istanbul, Turkey) and Eyebeam (NY, NY) and has shown her work at venues such as the Neuberger Museum (Purchase, NY), Künstlerhaus (Stuttgart, Germany), Kunstkammer AZB (Zürich, Switzerland) and the Contemporary Art Institute of Detroit (Detroit, MI). Selected profiles of her work have appeared in BOMB, Entorno, ArtInfo, Art Observed, the New York Times and Hyperallergic. She is the recipient of a 2013 Fellowship for Utopian Practice from Culture Push and a 2011 & 2012 Rema Hort Mann Foundation Individual Artist Grant Nominee. The artist earned her BA in Theater Studies from Yale University and an MFA in Performance and Interactive Media Arts (PIMA) from Brooklyn College.

Teal Gardner
Teal Gardner’s work centers around an interest in children’s play and the conceptual and physical spaces that are available for that play. The political, social, aesthetic and ecological facets of children’s play environments provide ample fodder for her investigation. Through a practice that is concerned with praxis, she utilizes social scenarios to bring about action. This can mean installing a show with children as collaborators or transforming a gallery space into a ‘free play zone’ and inviting the community to participate. Gardner binds together this work with writing, informed by research into pedagogy, design, landscape architecture, public policy, neuroscience, developmental psychology, ecology, philosophy and art history. A former fellow at the Union for Contemporary Art in Omaha, the artist attended the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, where she majored in Anthropology with minors in English and Art.

Lead Researchers
Nia Allison
Giovanni Barraza
Serenity Bryce
Hayley Danielson
Tori Dunston
Ta’Riance Harris
Michaela Hawkins
Cecilia Hoggatt
Tasheonna Lewis-Kent
Imani Murray
Eva Philips
Ana Pineda-Gutiewez
Daniel Pinto
Luis Salazar
Eros Shreve
Eva Taylor
Claire Tweedy
Brent Walker
Solomon Washington
Owen Zahm

The Urban Design Lab is generously supported by Lincoln Financial Foundation.

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Mary Mattingly: Flock House Project: Omaha

Mary Mattingly: Flock House Project: Omaha

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Mary Mattingly’s Flock House Project: Omaha, was a city wide workshop and exhibition developed during her residency at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, in Omaha, Nebraska.

What if migratory homes with autonomous systems for rainwater collection and food production were the building blocks of the city of the future? Inspired by patterns of global human migration and pilgrimage, the Flock House Project is a group of mobile, sculptural, public habitats and self-contained ecosystems that are movable, modular, and scalable.

This multi-phase project was part fantastic and part practical. It kicked off in Omaha on March 13, 2014, with an exhibition of Mattingly’s work at the Bemis Center. The exhibition included selected works from her Island (2009-2011), Anatomy of Melancholy (2007-ongoing), Second Nature (2006), Nomadographies (2009-2011), House and Universe (2013); and Wearable Portable Architecture (2011) bodies of work, as well as new works for her Tools series made at the Bemis Center. The centerpiece for the exhibition was one of the three portable structures from her 2012 Flock House Project, New York City.

Mary Mattingly: Flock House Project: Omaha exhibition brochure.

Unlike traditional exhibitions, however, the spaces also served as the artist’s active research hub while she was in residence at the Bemis Center, offering a space where she engaged the local community to develop plans for, and fabricate, new mobile living systems to be installed outdoors at both the Bemis Center in the Old Market and at Carver Bank in North Omaha. Omaha artists were then invited to occupy these living systems in order to promote and implement a broader integration between Omaha’s creative and urban design communities.

At a time when urban populations are faced with environmental, political and economic instability, dislocation and relocation become increasingly important to consider and reconcile. Addressing these themes and concerns, Mattingly first presented three Flock Houses across New York City during the summer of 2012. Her intention is to choreograph Flock Houses throughout urban centers across the United States. By constructing them, she seeks to enhance community-based interdependence, resourcefulness, learning, curiosity and creative exploration. Interactive community programs, workshops, lectures, performances and narrated tours focusing on Omaha’s history, current surroundings and future opportunities occurred throughout the summer. By engaging in a direct dialogue with Omaha’s history of community and innovation, the Flock House Project provided local residents and visitors with an opportunity to ponder the future of urban living.

During May 2014 a series of design/build workshops was held to develop a local iteration of her Flock House Project. Omaha residents had an opportunity to consider just how our urban landscape might look in the decades to come.

Mary and I talked with Justin Pazera of KMTV about the project.

Two Flock Houses were installed over summer in Omaha’s Old Market district and at Bemis Center’s Carver Bank location in North Omaha. To read about the process and about the participants’ experiences, visit the Tumblr account here.

For a listing of Old Market Flock House projects, click here.

For a listing of Carver Bank Flock House projects, click here.

Gallery Installation Shots:

 

Flock House Omaha design build:

Flock House Project: Omaha was developed through Design/Build Workshops in May 2014. During the workshops, the following people worked alongside Mattingly to create and install both the Old Market and Carver Bank Flock Houses:
Travis Apel: Artist/Organic Gardener/Builder
Dwayne Brown: Architect /Writer for Edible Omaha
Denise Chapman: Carver Bank Artist-in-Residence/Performer
Devel Crisp: Carver Bank Artist-in-Residence/Performer
Matt Cronin: Gardener/Community Activist
Tricia Custer: Video Production/Artist/Gardener
Angela Drakeford: Artist
Chance Frank: Artist/Gardener
Matt Freeman: Community Gardener
Cynthia Gehrie: Artist/Gardener
Neil Griess: Artist/Urban Activist
Catherine Harrington: Gardener/Builder/Cook
George Hewitt: Artist, Post Hurricane Katrina Rebuild Volunteer, Furniture
Dr. David J. Hibler, Sr.: Gardening, Community Activism
Maya Jeffereis: Bemis Center Artist-in-Residence/Installation/Sculpture/New Media/Performance
John Kerner: Architect/Artist
Jennifer Keys: Drawing/NAACP
Kim Reid Kuhn: Artist/Urban Activist/Teacher
Peter Langwith: Artist/Community Activist/Sustainable Living
Kayla Meyer: Landscape Architecture
Christina Narwicz: Artist/Gardener
Linn Norton: Art Education
Sarah O Donnell: Bemis Center Artist-in-Residence/Sculptor
Katie Parker: Bemis Center Artist-in-Residence/Sculptor
Dessi Price: Graphic Designer
Terri Sanders: Great Plains Black History Museum
Dr. Daniel Schober: Heath/Nutrition
Tyler Swain: Trash/Recycle Artist/Tinkerer/Construction
Travis Thieszen: Bemis Center Artist-in-Residence/Sculptor
Susan Thomas: Arts/Omaha Creative Institute
Liz Thrash: Gardener/Hobbyist

About Mary Mattingly:
Mary Mattingly is a New York City-based artist whose work has been supported by the James L. Knight Foundation, Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology, Yale University School of Art, the Harpo Foundation, NYFA, the Jerome Foundation and the Art Matters Foundation, among others. Mattingly has been featured in Art in America, Artforum, Dwell, China Business News, The New York Times, New York Magazine, Financial Times, New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, and the Village Voice. Mattingly’s efforts have also been covered by BBC News, MSNBC, Fox News, and on Art21’s New York Close Up series.

The artist merges performance, sculpture, architecture and photography to address issues of home, migration, cartography and living systems. She creates photographs and sculptures that depict future and obscure landscapes, makes wearable sculpture, “wearable homes,” and ecological installations. Her work has been exhibited at the International Center of Photography, the Seoul Art Center, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, the New York Public Library, deCordova Museum and Sculpture Park in Massachusetts and the Palais de Tokyo. Mattingly participated in smARTpower: an initiative between the U.S. Department of State and the Bronx Museum of the Arts as artist-ambassador to the Philippines.

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